Reduction Gears

Sorry, this is not an Amateur Radio post.

After many months of working with a 3D Printer, I have finally successfully created a working set of interlocking reduction gears, each section provides a 7:1 reduction. This device is about 2 inches in diameter, the total reduction is 14:1.

The original Ring Gear from Thingiverse was modified to create this multi-stage Reduction Gear. My contribution was to modify it as necessary and join two sets together.

Sketchup Model

The transfer plates (with the connecting pins) were assembled by adding the center HEX pin after printing.  Each of the two Reduction Cluster were printer as an assembled single object on the printer. No cleanup or filing was necessary.

Silicon grease is used for lube.

I may increase the size (and with other modification) this could be used as a Light Weight Field Day Antenna Rotor.

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Interesting ………

I read this e-mail on the Flying Pigs QRP Club International e-mail reflector:

Do you need an excuse to take your radio to a park? I try to go out and operate portable as often as I can, but sometimes the motivation is the hardest part. So this year I decided to make my own motivation, and invite some friends.

Announcing:
The Portableradio.org Fall Operating Event!

The rules are the same as ARRL Field Day (with a few minor modifications). Use your favorite log program and submit a summary to a google form available on portableradio.org

The event happens on the same schedule as ARRL Field Day, except on October 21-22, 2017.
Maybe your club does something big for Field Day and you’d like to try something different. Maybe you’ve got a different location you want to test out. Maybe it’s just too darn hot in the middle of the summer where you are. Whatever your reason, join us for the Portableradio.org Fall Operating Event on October 21-22, 2017.

This is a new event, so if you play please submit your summary sheet. The submission link will go live on portableradio.org closer to the event. Results will be posted as soon as possible and updated weekly until the log submission deadline (one month after the event), when they are considered final.

Check out portableradio.org for more details.
73,
N0ECK

At that time of the year up here in the Northeast, this might not be for the feint of heart, as it can get really cold towards the end of October, especially overnight. But then again, sometimes we get a late Indian Summer. Like any Amateur Radio event, participation is the key.  If they can get enough people out to participate, it may grow in the next few years.  If not, and participation is low, well ………… but why dwell on the negatives?

I wish them the best of luck!

72 de Larry W2LJ
QRP – When you care to send the very least!

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NASB: “Digital Radio Mondiale Delivers at IBC 2017”

Photo credit: NASB

 

(Source: National Association of Shortwave Broadcasters Facebook Page)

Digital Radio Mondiale Delivers at IBC 2017

Participants in the four DRM events organised at IBC by Gospell, Thomson Broadcast, Nautel and Ampegon between 15th-17th of September have had an insight into a wide range of DRM activities, from big projects in Morocco (Thomson Broadcast), India and Hungary (Nautel), to the progress of DRM in South Africa. And DRM used not just for broadcasting but for other vital activities was demonstrated by Rfmondial involved in a wide-ranging application for the US Coast Guard.

One constant for all events, each unique and so different from the other, was the positive messages about DRM in both AM and VHF and the increasing availability of new receiver and receiver solutions, many always on display. The first event on Friday the 15th (Gospell) saw the launch of GR-227 the multi-standard (DRM/DAB/DAB+) car adaptor that is compatible with any car stereo with USB port and able to work with Android Smart Tune App. As the manufacturer explained, this after-market solution can be a significant development allowing digital reception in cars initially fitted with analogue receivers.

Of equal major interest was also the Titus II multi-standard digital radio receiver produced by Titus SDR, a division of PantronX. The consumer software-defined radio digital receiver platform, which is the result of collaboration between Titus SDR/Patron X, Jasmin-Infotech, TWR, and Fraunhofer IIS, supports multi-standard radio reception, including DRM, DAB and DAB+ and core data applications. The representatives of PantronX and TWR received lots of questions about this receiver system based on a custom Android tablet platform, featuring multipoint touch, WiFi/Bluetooth and stereo sound.

Other receiver possibilities: the tablet solution presented by Fraunhofer IIS, the Indian receiver Avion, and a new concept DRM receiver produced in South Africa all enforced the idea that the excellent work done by transmitter companies like Thomson Broadcast, Nautel and Ampegon in providing a digital transmitter infrastructure in many parts of the world can link now with the innovative receiver solutions.

The Thomson event came alive with the presentation about the huge project in Morocco and the Nautel event attracted lots of guests already familiar with the big projects of this established transmitter manufacturer recently in India and now in Hungary.

The last of the DRM events, hosted on the 17th by Ampegon was a moment of celebration. First of this company (now 75 years old) displaying solid-state transmitters of all capacities successfully used globally, as well. As Ampegon has been also involved in Africa and supported the first DRM trial in South Africa two years ago, they were the natural hosts of a special DRM award moment. The DRM Enterprise Award 2017 (Africa) has been awarded to 3 pioneering experts in promoting DRM digital radio in South Africa. The winners are Dr Roelf Petersen on behalf of Radio Pulpit (member of the Pulpit Media Group) and Broadcom International involved in the trial of DRM in mediumwave. The other two winners Thembeka Khaka (Thembeka Khaka and Associates) and Johannes von Weyssenhoff have been very active in getting the legal framework and conducting the current trial (DRM for local coverage) that is taking place in conjunction with a community station in Johannesburg. (This event was streamed on Twitter click here to view.)

As Ruxandra Obreja, Consortium Chairman, remarked: ”All those who have hosted successful DRM events, the new and old supporters and specialists interested in digital radio and DRM, all the other companies supporting DRM and present at IBC (BBC, Babcock, Becil, RFI, Riz, NXP, Rfmondial, Sentech, to mention just a few) all the guests from countries as far apart as India, Argentina, the Netherlands, Belgium, Pakistan, the Philippines have seen how much effort goes so that DRM can deliver for all, globally.”

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Past QCWA General Manager, Former ARRL Staffer Jim LaPorta, N1CC, SK

ARRL — James “Jim” LaPorta, N1CC, of Frankston, Texas, died on September 20. He was 76. He was an ARRL and Quarter Century Wireless Association (QCWA) Life Member. LaPorta served as QCWA General Manager from March until December 2012.First licensed in 1956 as KN6SXX, LaPorta joined the US Army after high school and then went to work for the Army as a civilian in 1968 in Texas. While in Texas, he serve…

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Amateur Radio Enthusiasts are Handy in Emergencies:

eHam.net News — Winters resident Joe DeAngelo became curious about radio communications as a child, after hearing people speak in various foreign languages on his grandparents’ console radio system. “I would listen to the shortwave radio and listen to stations coming in that were speaking in different languages and I would be curious about where were these speakers coming from and why I was able to hear them so far away,” he said. He made his first forays into amateur radio — also known as ham radio — when he was 14 years old after reading about it in various electronics magazines. Today, DeAngelo is part of a large network of amateur radio enthusiasts in Yolo County who use ham radio for emergency services. Jay Ballinger, the club coordinator for UC Davis Amateur Radio Communications, said that when amateur radio was first defined by the government, part of the charter was to make different waves of radio available to amateurs so they could communicate using techniques such as Morse code, particularly during emergency situations when phone lines were down. Emergency services during natural disasters remains one of the major uses of ham radio. During Hurricane Katrina, DeAngelo said many amateur radio operators — or “hams” — were stationed in shelters where they served as the main means of communication because commercial services, such as phones, were not working.

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