S21ZDC Bhola Island. From DXNews.com

G3KHZ, DL6KVA, G4EDG, S21ED, S21TV will be active from Bhola Island, IOTA AS – 140, 13 – 18 October 2017 as S21ZDC.

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FCC Affirms Huge Fine in New York Interference Case

ARRL — The FCC has affirmed a huge fine of more than $400,000 on Jay Peralta, a Queens, New York, man who has admitted to making unauthorized transmissions on New York City Police Department (NYPD) radio frequencies, maliciously interfering with officers’ communications. The FCC had sent Peralta a Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) last April 14. Peralta, 20, is alleged to have transmitted false bomb …

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ARRL Executive Committee to Meet October 14 in Connecticut

ARRL — The ARRL Executive Committee of the Board of Directors will meet on Saturday, October 14. ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, will chair the session, which will hear reports from officers and the general counsel. Topping the agenda are FCC regulatory matters, including a review of enforcement issues and concerns, as well as open items with no FCC action since the July 2017 Board meeting.The Ama…

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SDR Spectrum to Radio: Can someone please make this device?

The venerable RF switch box from the 1970s/80s allowed game consoles and computers to use analog TVs as monitors.

As I’ve mentioned in the past, I actively record and index radio spectrum recordings via my various software defined receivers. Indeed, I have at least 50 TB of SDR spectrum recordings at the moment–and that number is growing!

I was just chatting with SWLing Post contributor, Mark Fahey, and a familiar topic came up: the idea of an RF switch box for radios.

The concept is a piece of hardware that re-modulates–converts digital spectrum data from a digital storage device back to analog RF– and injects a signal into a real tabletop radio.

As Mark described:

“This is just like early computers and Atari-like games consoles did to allow the “computer” to display on a lounge room TV. The games console tricked the TV into thinking it was tuned to a TV station on “Channel 1 (or whatever the console outputted the video to).”

Radio time travel machine!

How cool would it be to take a spectrum recording from 2008, play it through your Hallicrafters SX-100, Kenwood R-1000 or Alinco DX-R8T, and tune through the 31 meter band? You’d receive Radio Australia, Radio Bulgaria, Radio Netherlands Worldwide, Radio Canada International, Voice of Russia and many other broadcasters that are no longer on the air. Indeed, there’s a strong possibility you might uncover DX you didn’t catch when the recording was first made.

I’m enough of a radio geek to know that I would thoroughly enjoy travelling back in time once in a while with a classic radio.

Additionally, this device would make it much easier for museums to create kiosks where visitors could tune through recordings of, say, important events in history.

Can it be done?

I know the technology is out there.  In fact, if you’ve ever been to a large hamfest where Icom, Yaesu or Kenwood have a number of their transceivers “on the air”–so customers can try out transceiver features–they are using a device called a “radio time machine.”

Icom uses recorded IF instead of live antenna input so customers can experience “contest conditions” while evaluating a radio.

The Radio Time Machine injects recorded analog RF, from a HiFi VCR, into the antenna ports of a vendor’s various transceivers. The recordings are typically of a ham radio band during a contest–that way, the customer can get a sense of how well the rig would perform under crowded band conditions.

These devices have limitations: while their bandwidth is ample to tune through the CW or phone portion of a ham band, it’s much too narrow for most broadcast bands. They’re also fed the recording from an analog HiFi VCR.

The device Mark and I dream of would convert digital spectrum files–from a WinRadio, Perseus, Elad, SDRplay, Airspy or other SDR–into analog RF any radio with an external antenna port could tune.

SWLing Post readers: you’re a diverse and knowledgeable community–please comment if you know what it would take to develop such a device and how it could be done. Is this a dream or could it become reality?

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From the Isle of Music & Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, Oct. 15-21

From the Isle of Music, Oct 15-21:
This week, our special guest is William Borrego, whose debut solo album Acerca el Oido was awarded a Cubadisco in 2017 in the Conjuntos y Otros Formatos category as well as nominated for another one in the Opera Prima (best new artist) category, AND he sings in Leyendas.com, also nominated in Conjuntos y Otros Formatos. We will listen to a lot of music from that category as well as a couple of surprises.
Four opportunities to listen on shortwave:
1. For Eastern Europe but audible well beyond the target area in most of the Eastern Hemisphere (including parts of East Asia and Oceania) with 100Kw, Sunday 1500-1600 UTC on SpaceLine, 9400 KHz, from Kostinbrod, Bulgaria (1800-1900 MSK)
2. For the Americas and parts of Europe, Tuesday 0000-0100 UTC on WBCQ, 7490 KHz from Monticello, ME, USA (Monday 8-9PM EDT in the US)
3 & 4. For Europe and sometimes beyond, Tuesday 1900-2000 UTC and Saturday 1200-1300 UTC on Channel 292, 6070 KHz from Rohrbach, Germany.

Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot, Oct 15
It’s Greek Week!
Episode 32 of Uncle Bill’s Melting Pot will be mostly some absolutely sublime Greek music. If you listen to VOG even though you don’t speak a word of Greek, this episode’s for you. You bring the Ouzo, we’ll bring the music.
Sunday, October 15 at 2200-2230 UTC (6:00pm-6:30pm EDT US) on WBCQ 7490 Khz.

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