Old Weather Radio Technology Still Most Trusted for Tracking Monsoons:

eHam.net News — Weather Radio is the steady stream of rough messages broadcast 24/7 and picked up by your favorite radio stations when the weather turns. They’re a nearly daily occurrence in Arizona right now, warning of flash flooding in Douglas, winds in Tucson, and severe storms just outside Phoenix. This recent broadcast in Nogales warned people to move to the first floor of whatever building they were in. And if it sounds a little garbled, there’s a reason for that. Dan Leins is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Tucson. Scientist and meteorologist Dan Leins demonstrates the NOAA Weather Radio at the National Weather Service in Tucson. “They got their start with a person who would go live on the radio when they had active weather going on. They would either speak live or do recordings on tape. And that would play back over and over and over again. That would run 24/7 if there was active weather in the middle of the night,” Leins saidIt’s a technology from the last century. In fact, before Twitter, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Radio All Hazards — or, Weather Radio — was intended as a way for the president to reach the country. “If there’s a natural disaster, if there was a nuclear disaster, the system was designed to pick up broadcasts like that and redistribute them nationally instantly. That was one of the main purposes that NOAA weather radio all hazards was deployed.”

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Amateur Radio Clubs Monitor Weather, Events:

eHam.net News — (TNS) — Specialized technology and code names may sound like elements of a spy movie; but they are also tools used by members of amateur radio clubs. “We’re the most anonymous organization you’re going to find,” said McPherson Amateur Radio Club member Richard Johnson. “Most people have no idea what we do or how we do it.” The Newton Amateur Radio Club and the McPherson Amateur Radio Club support numerous events by providing communications services and serving as weather spotters. “We are basically two clubs operating jointly,” said Russell Groves, president of the McPherson Amateur Radio Club. “They’re separate entities with separate charters, but we do just about everything together.” The majority of the events their members, who are also known as hams, work are marathons or bike rides that can cover more than 50 miles of roads or trails. As participants pass by stations, the radio operators note if anyone is experiencing health problems, is being chased by a dog, has an emergency call coming in or needs to drop out and arrange transportation from the middle of the course. “We try to be very efficient in the information we’re passing. It isn’t a lot of chit-chat, it’s just information as needed to be conveyed to the right people,” Groves said. “We keep track of the riders and the runners so we know where everybody is on the course. If someone doesn’t make it from one stop to another, we’re keeping track of that, too.” The system also ensures riders or runners who get lost are found and that the event does not end until everyone is accounted for.

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Amateur Radio Association Keeping ‘The Other Wireless’ Alive:

eHam.net News — WASILLA — The Matanuska Amateur Radio Association is a general interest amateur radio club with approximately 100 members. You may not see them, but if you have a scanner, chances are you’ve heard them. According to MARA secretary Tabitha Sherman, the group is comprised of folks from every walk of life with at least one thing in common, the love of amateur, or ham radio. Group officers said MARA members are involved in every aspect of amateur radio. The organization makes a special effort to participate in providing communications support for public service events, field days, marathons, sled dog and snow machine races — local and statewide, avalanche rescues, and wildland fires.

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Is Our Sun Slowing Down in Its Middle Age?

eHam.net News — The Sun has changed its figure, researchers say, and might keep it that way. The structure of the Sun’s surface, where sunspots live, appears to have changed markedly 23 years ago. That’s when solar magnetic activity might have started slowing down, Rachel Howe (University of Birmingham, UK, and Aarhaus University, Denmark) and collaborators speculate in paper to appear in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (full text here). Such a structural change might help explain the Sun’s mysteriously weak cycles in recent years.

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Old Weather Radio Technology Still Most Trusted for Tracking Monsoons:

Weather Radio is the steady stream of rough messages broadcast 24/7 and picked up by your favorite radio stations when the weather turns. They’re a nearly daily occurrence in Arizona right now, warning of flash flooding in Douglas, winds in Tucson, and severe storms just outside Phoenix. This recent broadcast in Nogales warned people to move to the first floor of whatever building they were in. And if it sounds a little garbled, there’s a reason for that. Dan Leins is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Tucson. Scientist and meteorologist Dan Leins demonstrates the NOAA Weather Radio at the National Weather Service in Tucson. “They got their start with a person who would go live on the radio when they had active weather going on. They would either speak live or do recordings on tape. And that would play back over and over and over again. That would run 24/7 if there was active weather in the middle of the night,” Leins saidIt’s a technology from the last century. In fact, before Twitter, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Radio All Hazards — or, Weather Radio — was intended as a way for the president to reach the country. “If there’s a natural disaster, if there was a nuclear disaster, the system was designed to pick up broadcasts like that and redistribute them nationally instantly. That was one of the main purposes that NOAA weather radio all hazards was deployed.”

from dx news http://ift.tt/2tp02ot
via IFTTT

Amateur Radio Clubs Monitor Weather, Events:

(TNS) — Specialized technology and code names may sound like elements of a spy movie; but they are also tools used by members of amateur radio clubs. “We’re the most anonymous organization you’re going to find,” said McPherson Amateur Radio Club member Richard Johnson. “Most people have no idea what we do or how we do it.” The Newton Amateur Radio Club and the McPherson Amateur Radio Club support numerous events by providing communications services and serving as weather spotters. “We are basically two clubs operating jointly,” said Russell Groves, president of the McPherson Amateur Radio Club. “They’re separate entities with separate charters, but we do just about everything together.” The majority of the events their members, who are also known as hams, work are marathons or bike rides that can cover more than 50 miles of roads or trails. As participants pass by stations, the radio operators note if anyone is experiencing health problems, is being chased by a dog, has an emergency call coming in or needs to drop out and arrange transportation from the middle of the course. “We try to be very efficient in the information we’re passing. It isn’t a lot of chit-chat, it’s just information as needed to be conveyed to the right people,” Groves said. “We keep track of the riders and the runners so we know where everybody is on the course. If someone doesn’t make it from one stop to another, we’re keeping track of that, too.” The system also ensures riders or runners who get lost are found and that the event does not end until everyone is accounted for.

from dx news http://ift.tt/2uKEuGB
via IFTTT